Monday, August 7, 2017

IMPERFECTION


Victoria asks that we consider
Wabi-sabi (the beauty of imperfection)
 for our Haibun this Week.
Submitted to dVerse
August 7, 2017





Eloquent with age
secrets lie within
your chipped porcelain
of lips that drank
from your communal cup
cool, clear water
from some unknown well
I drink from your beauty
enhanced by the scars of time
My thirst is slaked
with your eloquence.

****************

faded porcelain
for everything a season
your beauty remains

*****************


11 comments:

  1. I really latch on to that wonder of the history of things. Who drank from that mug, who lived in that abandoned house etc. Beautifully written.

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  2. An excellent job, Bev. We used to have used chipped cups from second hand stores, when we first got married--but when my wife replaced them with new ones, the charming chipped returned to the second hand store shelves in order to enrich other lives.

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  3. Beautiful story, how you imagine what happened in the life of the porcelain cup. You just never know. How many famous, or ordinary people stopped for a drink from it.

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  4. The scars of time are beautiful Bev ~

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  5. Lovely! I especially likes these lines:
    of lips that drank
    from your communal cup
    cool, clear water
    from some unknown well

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  6. I like the thought of cups and mugs holding secrets - they must hear plenty over the years. That's a stunning haiku, Bev:
    faded porcelain
    for everything a season
    your beauty remains

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  7. Beautiful Haibun Bev and the Haiku is the cherry on top. Wonderful stuff.

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  8. Yes, it does. Look closely, it is even more beautiful because of the scars.

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  9. Wonderful response to the prompt. I especially love these lines:
    "My thirst is slaked
    with your eloquence."

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  10. Eloquent with age—I like that :)

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  11. Beauty remains though the porcelain is faded. I liked how you started and ended the prose part with a form of eloquence.

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