Monday, March 19, 2018

THE WHY OF IT

Haibun Monday, and we’re asked the
Who, When and Why of our poetic effort…
who inspired us, what’s our style, and
why we write.   Surely that sends us all
into the throes of self examination!
Submitted to dVerse 
March 19, 2018

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seasons come and go
our life pages turn onward
as autumn turns to winter
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When I look the long way back to my childhood, I recall 
my mother reciting poetry to me.  Her favorite was James
Whitcomb Riley’s “Li’l Orphant Annie”.   Something about
the rhythm and rhyme was soothing to me.  There were
other poems she’d been required to memorize in her brief
years of schooling, but the others fade from my memory. 
Surely, though, it was my mother’s love of poetry that was
my inspiration.  My first poem, probably at the age of
about 10,  is lost in the pages of time, but I remember the
first couple of lines, no doubt written after a rousing Bible
study class …
“Is there dust on your Bible
Dust on your holy book
Then there’s dust on your heart, brother
Are you afraid to look?”
For the next 70 plus years (and to this day) I took solace in
the rhythm of rhyming poetry, so my style remains that
somewhat outdated style, which seems to have given way
to open verse.   Why do I write?  Simply because I feel the
need to commit to paper thoughts and events in my life,
sometimes in rhyme and often in prose form.   I like to
think one day some descendant will be interested
in the life and times of a remote ancestor!

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Photo is my own digital art.


19 comments:

  1. Surely you will have an impact upon a descendant. I treasure my grandmother's journal of Yellowstone 1914! James Whitcomb Riley - I took my young children to Indianapolis museum years ago and they had a special day celebrating him - we got to "meet" him and hear "him" read his poems. My son is poet, singer, guitar player, actor, and I like to think my early exposure to such things as this inspired him (we homeschooled up through 3rd grade :)

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    1. Thanks for sharing, Margaret. Our children are little blank slates we write on, aren't they?

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  2. Good for your mom to expose you early to poetry Bev.

    A good reason to write and share your work....who knows someday your descendent may also want to be poet and writer.

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  3. Lovely. I really enjoyed reading your lovely piece today.

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  4. I'm amazed you can remember your first effort, I can recall mine too, but sadly its so bad I have never been able to get it out of my head.

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  5. Super story Beverly. I too was exposed to poetry at an early age. You found your style of writing as well. Thank you sharing this lovely story

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  6. I find solace in the "rhythm of rhyming poetry" as well.

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    1. I see it in your work, Frank, and I enjoy it very much!

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  7. This is lovely. It seems many of us find this a meditative experience.

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  8. I love the phrase 'our life pages turn onward'! I've always loved reciting poetry in the same way as singing songs: both are comforting and soothing. Mothers reading and singing to small children is so important, which is why I lead Bounce and Rhyme sessions at local libraries and am determined to share nursery rhymes, songs and poems with my grandson.

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    1. Bless you for your library work. You are making memories for lots of wee folk!

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  9. A lovely poetical legacy from your mother and passed on to your descendants, Bev. Your digital art is the perfect companion to your haibun!

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    1. Thank you, Lynn. I enjoy scrolling through my archive of digital art and finding a piece that matches our challenge.

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  10. I like that early poem of yours. Having dust on one's heart should be a cause for concern!

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  11. I enjoyed reading about your writing.

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  12. Love this story.. and the thought of leaving that trace of yourself is a great thought...

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  13. Our words never die. I love this story. ..and kudos to your mum for shaping you😊

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  14. Good to have this memory of where and when. Also, your poetry is wonderful, rhymed or not. I do not consider it old-fashioned, merely another tool.

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